Anna Krowczynska
Anna Krowczynska

1953 - 2014
Longtime board member and aquarium volunteer... She will be missed

Upcoming Meetings
Speaker schedule subject to change without notice

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014, 6:30 pm.
George Buckley, NEAq Board Member -

“Limulus: The REAL Blue Blood”

Click to show meeting description

Horseshoe crab

The horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is a dynamic and unique marine invertebrate whose blood is a hugely valuable biomedical resource. While the blood helps to save human lives the eggs provide a vital food source for migratory birds. Join us as we explore the ecology, management and importance of this charismatic animal.

George Buckey is an NEAq board member, Boston Sea Rovers board member and Harvard Professor.



General Meetings are held the third Wednesday of each month, at the New England Aquarium Conference Center (located on the first floor of the Harbor Garage). Click here for directions

At each general meeting there will be the monthly drawing for a chance to have a hands on aquarium experience.

For directions and more info about all our meetings, visit our Club Meetings Page

Scholarships

Every year dive organizations offer scholarships and internships to high school students interested in diving or marine sciences. Application deadlines are fast approaching, visit each link for elegibility and more information:


Underwater Pumpkin Carving canceled

Mass Diving's Pumpkin Carving event this weekend (10/25/14) has been canceled.


 

Cashes Ledge

Cashes Ledge, located about 80 miles east of Cape Ann, Massachusetts, is a unique underwater mountain range which provides refuge for a vibrant, diverse world of ocean wildlife. If not protected soon, it will face devastating threats.

Cashes Ledge is important not only to marine life but also to scientists hoping to learn about the health and function of New England’s oceans many scientists believe that Cashes Ledge represents the best remaining example of an undisturbed Gulf of Maine ecosystem. As a result, scientists have used Cashes Ledge as an underwater laboratory for decades.

Modern commercial fishing technologies make Cashes Ledge extremely susceptible to damage from bottom trawling gear. A trawl could strip clear the kelp forest on Ammen Rock and completely alter the ecosystem that depends on it for decades or more. Some anemone populations could take up to 230 years to recover from a single drag of a bottom trawl.

Bottom trawling and scallop dredging on Cashes Ledge has been banned for over a decade, but the New England Fishery Management Council recently voted to reverse even these temporary protections and open Cashes Ledge to trawling.

Cashes Ledge needs permanent protection. CLF is committed to securing permanent protection to ensure the long-term health of this important and vulnerable ecosystem. Please join us in working to protect this world class undersea treasure.

Click here to sign a petition to help protect Cashes Ledge.

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