Hitchhikers guide to invasive species MIT Sea Grant produces the Hitchhikers Guide to Exotic Species, a guide to spotting non-native invader species. Download a copy in PDF format. Waterproof guides are also available here

The Bay vs the Bag works with cities and counties around the Bay to protect our waterways from plastic bag pollution. We advocate for strong ordinances that ban plastic bags and place a charge on paper, with the ultimate goal of transitioning consumers to reusable bags

Coastsweep
Volunteers throughout Massachusetts turn out in large numbers each September and October for COASTSWEEP, the statewide coastal cleanup.

The Massachusetts Bays Program is a partnership of citizens, communities and government that strives to protect and enhance the coastal health and heritage of Massachusetts and Cape Cod Bays

The New England Aquarium's hotline for any stranded marine animal is (617) 973-5247
All reports of living or dead marine animals should be reported to the hotline #, which is manned 24/7. Land animals and marine birds should be reported to town/city animal control.
What to do
More info

Northeast Seafood Watch
A program of Monterey Bay Aquarium designed to raise consumer awareness about the importance of buying seafood from sustainable sources.
NEW: Seafood watch by text message: text the word: "FISH" and the fish type to 30644 (normal text rates apply)

Environmental News

Some great tips for living Blue!

Help save sharks!
Sharks are declining at an extraordinary rate and need our help!
Here are some great links thanks to our friends at Shark Savers!

Help us stop Shark Fin Soup in MA!
Do you know a restaurant serving shark fin soup?
Help save sharks and encourage them to change their menu with some great information and printouts from Shark Savers:
http://www.sharksavers.org/en/our-programs/i-m-finished-with-fins/get-active/restaurants/

See who is serving currently Shark Fin Soup in MA!
http://awionline.org/content/restaurants-currently-offering-shark-fin-soup#Massachusetts

See videos on Shark Savers YouTube Channel:
http://www.youtube.com/user/sharksavers

Learn more about Sharks Count Program (Divers Counting Sharks):
http://www.sharksavers.org/en/our-programs/sharkscount/

Manta Ray of Hope: Help save Mantas before it is too late!
http://www.sharksavers.org/en/our-programs/manta-ray-of-hope/

Our Save the Sea Turtles campaign!
Sign our petition to stop mass balloon releases to save sea turtles:
http://www.change.org/petitions/all-those-who-want-to-help-save-our-marine-wildlife-spread-the-word-and-put-an-end-to-mass-balloon-releases-in-massachusetts


The Bay vs the Bag

Bay/Bag
A great video about plastic bags...and why we should reduce, reuse and recycle.
Try bringing a cloth bag the next time you go shopping!


COASTSWEEP

The Massachusetts Annual Statewide Beach Cleanup

Volunteers throughout Massachusetts turn out in large numbers each September and October for COASTSWEEP, the statewide coastal cleanup sponsored by the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and coordinated by the Urban Harbors Institute (UHI) of the University of Massachusetts Boston. COASTSWEEP will celebrate its 25th anniversary in 2012.

COASTSWEEP is part of the International Coastal Cleanup organized by Ocean Conservancy in Washington, DC. Volunteers from all over the world collect marine debris and record the types of trash they collect. This information is then analyzed and used to identify sources of debris and to develop education and policy initiatives to help reduce marine debris globally.

To volunteer for an event, organize your own cleanup, or learn more about COASTSWEEP, see the following links:

twitter Facebook


Coastsweep Sept 25, 2010

COASTSWEEP is part of the International Coastal Cleanup organized by The Ocean Conservancy in Washington, DC. 2010 marks the International Coastal Cleanup's 25th anniversary. Participants all over the world collect marine debris and record the types of trash they collect. This information is then used to help reduce marine debris.

COASTSWEEP will kickoff its 23rd year on Saturday, September 25 at Lynn and Nahant Beach Reservation at 9:00 am. From more information, visit the kickoff page.

Each year, thousands of COASTSWEEP volunteers take to the beaches, river banks, and seafloor to help remove debris that would otherwise pollute our oceans. The cleanups are organized at each location by a dedicated local coordinator or beach captain.

To participate with the NEADC, email the environmental coordinator. For more information, visit the Coastsweep 2010 Website


Midway Atoll Sea Turtle Conservation

Wayne Stentman, a former club speaker passed along word of a conservation program.
More info at the Oceanic Society website

This participatory program will provide a personalized look at sea turtle research and conservation efforts. Along with assisting George and Marc in the field, the group will participate in the full range of natural history activities Midway offers. In addition to our standard educational programs special informative lectures will be presented covering sea turtle biology, current research projects, and the history of recovery of the Hawaiian green turtle population.  Extra activities will include monitoring of turtle movements, recording sex and age classes, and observing basking turtles for evidence of tumors. If specific areas of the lagoon are identified where turtles are feeding, we may organize snorkeling surveys to sample vegetation and use waterproof tag readers to take advantage of non-disturbing opportunities to resight previously tagged individuals (about 150 tagged from 2001 and earlier). This is the first research opportunity George and Marc have had to observe turtles on Midway since 2001. It is hoped that these scoping efforts will provide important observations that can assist FWS refuge biologists, in determining future research needs related to green turtle conservation at Midway Atoll.


We're killing the oceans!

In November, the Boston Pheonix featured an article about unsustainable fishing practices and an interview with New England native and National Geographic photographer Brian Skerry. It's an interesting read: We're Killing the Oceans.
"You take a net, and you scrape it along the bottom to catch shrimp. In the process, everything else all the little stuff that lives on the bottom, the sponges and the coral and all the habitat for baby animals you wipe all that out. To catch one pound of shrimp, we might kill 12 pounds of other animals that get thrown back into the sea [dead] as by-catch. "If we did that on land to catch a single deer you go through the forest and kill all the raccoons and squirrels and skunks and everything that lives there people would be outraged. Yet you can do it in the ocean and nobody cares."
http://thephoenix.com/Boston/News/93157-Were-killing-the-oceans/

Ocean Acidification

There was a recent article in Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute's Oceanus Newsletter about Ocean Acidification, which shows that the process may actually help certain organizms grow bigger shells (but only up to a certain acidity)

Ocean Acidification: A Risky Shell Game

More about ocean acidification:


PADI International Cleanup Day 9/19/09

PADI's International Cleanup Day: Project AWARE has scheduled it for September 19, and is asking divers in 100 countries to volunteer to clean up trash, especially plastic bags, in coastal dive sites. All data collected by volunteers will be used in the Ocean Conservancy's Global Marine Debris Index (it reported 1.4 million plastic bags were collected on Cleanup Day last year). You can also organize your own local cleanup project; Project AWARE gives you the tools to get started and record data. Details are at: https://www.projectaware.org/english/take_action/international_cleanup_day.aspx


COASTSWEEP 2009

The Massachusetts Annual Statewide Beach Cleanup

Volunteers throughout Massachusetts turn out in large numbers each year for COASTSWEEP, the state-wide beach cleanup sponsored by the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and coordinated by the Urban Harbors Institute (UHI) of the University of Massachusetts Boston. COASTSWEEP will kickoff its 22nd year on September 19, 2009.

COASTSWEEP is part of the International Coastal Cleanup organized by The Ocean Conservancy in Washington, DC. Participants all over the world collect marine debris and record the types of trash they collect. This information is then used to help reduce future marine debris problems.

Each year, thousands of COASTSWEEP volunteers take to the beaches, river banks, and seafloor to help remove debris that would otherwise pollute our oceans. The cleanups are organized at each location by a dedicated local coordinator or beach captain. To volunteer for the 2009 event, organize your own cleanup, or to learn more about COASTSWEEP, see the following links:

If anyone is interested in doing a cleanup, contact Shawn at environmental@neadc.org


Beach Cleanup

Beach clean up May 30th. Cookout to follow at Camp Harbor View. RSVP to Shawn Cormier at environmental@neadc.org Deadline to respond is May 25

When: Saturday, May 30th, 2009 10:00am—3:00pm

Where: Camp Harbor View, Long Island, Boston Harbor, One Mood Island Road, Boston, MA 02171

Why: Camp Harbor View needs a good spring cleaning to get ready for another great summer season

What: Activities will include landscaping, gardening, beach clean-up, as well as a multitude of indoor clean-up projects, such as painting and window washing.

*Lunch will be served

 


Coastsweep 2009

Join us for this annual state-wide cleanup effort!

More info as it comes!


Stellwagen Bank Report Card

NOAA's Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary has released the sanctuary's first-ever *Condition Report*, a "report card" on the status of sanctuary resources, the impending release of the draft management plan which we anticipate will be available for public comment in the early summer. The documents can be accessed at http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/science/condition/.

The sanctuary appears to be working toward their goals, - the only declining conditions are the invasive [MORE INFO]species and the the negative impacts of fishing gear on maritime archaeological resources.


Do Marine Protected Areas Really Work?

Here's an interesting aticle from Wood's Hole's Oceanus Magazine about whether closing parts of the ocean to fishing really works to preserve fish stocks. It specifically focuses on George's Bank

"These closures have given us a unique opportunity to examine a marine protected area in a temperate system under a “macroscope”—to examine how marine ecosystems are structured and how they function and recover. The long history of research on Georges Bank adds a foundation of scientific knowledge that makes the Georges Bank MPA an ideal system to test the effects of year-round fishery closures."

More


Cleanup photo gallery

Photos from the various dive club cleanups are in the scrapbook



NEADC Logo